A brief introduction to the Semitic languages by Aaron D. Rubin PDF

By Aaron D. Rubin

ISBN-10: 1617198609

ISBN-13: 9781617198601

With a written historical past of approximately 5 thousand years, the Semitic languages contain one of many international s earliest attested and longest attested households. popular family members contain Arabic, Hebrew, Aramaic, Amharic, and Akkadian. This quantity offers an summary of this significant language relatives, together with either historical and smooth languages. After a quick creation to the historical past of the relations and its inner category, next chapters disguise issues in phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicon.Each bankruptcy describes good points which are attribute of the Semitic language kinfolk as a complete, in addition to the various extra awesome advancements that happen within the person languages. this gives either a typological review and an outline of extra detailed good points. The chapters comprise considerable examples from a number of languages. the entire examples comprise morpheme via morpheme glosses, in addition to translations, which help in making those examples transparent and available even to these no longer acquainted with a given language. Concluding the booklet is an in depth advisor to extra examining, which directs the reader to an important reference instruments and secondary literature, and an updated bibliography.This short advent includes a wealthy number of information, and covers themes now not quite often present in brief sketches corresponding to this. The readability of presentation makes it important not just to these within the box of Semitic linguistics, but in addition to the overall linguist or language fanatic who needs to benefit whatever approximately this significant language relatives.

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The number of verbal stems differs for each language. For example, in Syriac there are six stems (with vestiges of others), in Classical Arabic there are fifteen, and in NENA of Arbel there are just two. Moreover, the functions of a particular stem in one language do not always correspond with its functions in another language. , 7etqabbal 'be received', D-Stem qabbel 'receive'). It is important to point out that a derived stem verb need not have a corresponding G·Stem verb. For example, in Arabic, the verb 7arsala 'send' is a C·Stem verb, but the root RSL does not occur in the G·Stem.

Several dialects of NENA have a future-marking particle bod- (variants bot-, b-, d-), which is derived from an ear­ lier Aramaic construction bafe d- 'want that' or bfe d- 'it is de­ sired that' (33). ' (Abdel-Massih et al. 1 979) There are no first or third person imperatives in Semitic, though there is a jussive mood that fulfills the function of the impera­ tive for these persons. The jussive in Proto-Semitic seems to have been identical in shape to the perfective verbal form. ari), the active participle has come to indicate future tense, with the result that the inherited non-past form has become the basic present tense.

Liiwawwiit'ii 'vary (change often); change completely' (vs. 'ii 'change') (Les· lau 1995). The number of verbal stems differs for each language. For example, in Syriac there are six stems (with vestiges of others), in Classical Arabic there are fifteen, and in NENA of Arbel there are just two. Moreover, the functions of a particular stem in one language do not always correspond with its functions in another language. , 7etqabbal 'be received', D-Stem qabbel 'receive'). It is important to point out that a derived stem verb need not have a corresponding G·Stem verb.

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A brief introduction to the Semitic languages by Aaron D. Rubin


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